Summer Solstice in Sacred Wales

Welsh Summer Solstice Ritual

The solstice is regarded as a special time in many spiritual traditions. At the Hermitage, a Buddhist retreat centre in historic Gwynedd, Wales, we marked the occasion this week with a celebratory smoke puja, called a Lhasang.

Welsh Buddhist Lhasang

Solstice Lhasang in full swing

Our Buddhist summer solstice ritual was attended by Lama Shenpen Hookham, the Hermitage staff and a bevy of local Sangha (Sanskrit: Buddhist Community) members.

Solstice Ritual

Some members of our Gwynedd, Welsh Buddhist Community

Tara Dew was master of ceremonies and produced a beautiful shrine and some wonderful offerings to be consumed by our Lhasang fire. Jayasiddhi built the fire and piled on heaps of dampened juniper to produce large clouds of white smoke.

Welsh Buddhist shrine

Summer Solstice Buddhist Shrine

The Lhasang litrugy was chanted during the solstice offerings. This is a text produced by Rigdzin Shikpo and was originally written for the Longchen Foundation.

The afternoon had started wonderfully sunny and hot. As our chanting reached its crescendo, accompanied by Garuda Mudras (Garuda = an Indo/Tibetan mythical bird/person, Mudra = ritual hand gesture), the skies clouded over and we enjoyed a wonderful purification in the form of large drops of warm rain! The rain stopped as soon as the chanting finished!

Welsh Solstice

Lama Shenpen and friends with Buddhist Liturgy at the ready

Tibetan Buddhist Smoke Offering

The smoke from the Lhasang is thought to provide a ritual purification for the local environment, local beings (human and non-human) and for the participants. Pure substances such as torma ( a kind of Tibetan ritual cake), herbs, oils and flowers are added to the fire as an offering and therefore incorporated in the clouds of white smoke which rise up to the heavens. It is normal to wear the smoke infused clothes worn at a Lhasang for a number of days as a blessing.

Buddhist flower offering

Flower Petals Offered into the Fire

Thin Places and Liminal Times

Certain places are thought to be liminal, a “thin place” in the ancient spiritual traditions of Wales and the British Isles. They behave as boundaries between two realities or ways of being. Similarly, In Tibetan Buddhism, certain times of day and year are also thought to be liminal or “thin”.

At these times of transition there is a greater opportunity for forces to manifest in the world – for good or for ill. For this reason, Tibetan monasteries chant liturgies invoking the wrathful protective Buddhist deities as the day transitions into night. Changes of moon, season and New Year, also have their own special Buddhist rituals to mark these phase changes.